How to remove Windows 10 apps with PowerShell

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Microsoft has released a new version of Windows 10, and many people are discovering that their old programs will no longer work with this update. Luckily there is still an easy way to remove these apps without needing to reinstall the whole operating system! PowerShell can help you in your endeavors.

The “remove built-in apps windows 10 20h2” is a command-line tool that allows users to remove built-in apps from Windows 10.

How to remove Windows 10 apps with PowerShell

The built-in applications in Windows 10 range from basic programs like Calculator and Weather to more task-oriented apps like Mail and Photos. While these built-in applications are great in most scenarios, they may be unsuitable, redundant, or unsupported in a business setting. These applications often provide a security concern. As a result, in this article, you’ll discover how to delete Windows 10 applications using PowerShell.

The issue is that uninstalling some of these programs is difficult for Microsoft. When utilizing standard removal techniques, there is no remove button. PowerShell is required to remove the built-in programs.

Please note that you do not need to remove all of the Windows 10 applications. Many are required for the Windows 10 “Experience,” while others, such as the.NET framework, are required by other apps. Choose your programs carefully while uninstalling them. You may, however, reinstall all of the programs, and you’ll find a PowerShell function for that at the conclusion of this post.

Using PowerShell to find Windows 10 apps

We will be dealing with two distinct types of apps.

  • AppX packages are pre-installed applications that come with the operating system.
  • AppX supplied packages – Applications installed during the initial creation of the user profile.

The first step is to make a list of all the applications that have been installed. Start PowerShell with elevated access and perform the Get-AppxPackage command. This will show you all of the AppX packages that are currently installed on Windows 10.

PS C:> Get-AppxPackage Name : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6 Publisher : CN=Microsoft Corporation, O=Microsoft Corporation, L=Redmond, S=Washington, C=US Architecture : X64 ResourceId : Version : 1.6.24903.0 PackageFullName : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_1.6.24903.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe InstallLocation : C:Program FilesWindowsAppsMicrosoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_1.6.24903.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe IsFramework : True PackageFamilyName : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_8wekyb3d8bbwe PublisherId : 8wekyb3d8bbwe IsResourcePackage : False IsBundle : False IsDevelopmentMode : False IsPartiallyStaged : False SignatureKind : Store Status : Ok –snip–

The supplied packages need the Online argument and have a somewhat different command. Instead of pulling packages from a local directory, the Online option retrieves packages from the current online operating system. This will provide a list of all the information for each package.

PS C:> Get-AppxProvisionedPackage -Online DisplayName : Microsoft.3DBuilder Version : 16.1.1431.0 Architecture : neutral ResourceId : ~ PackageName : Microsoft.3DBuilder_16.1.1431.0_neutral_~_8wekyb3d8bbwe Regions : DisplayName : Microsoft.BingWeather Version : 4.31.11905.0 Architecture : neutral ResourceId : ~ PackageName : Microsoft.BingWeather_4.31.11905.0_neutral_~_8wekyb3d8bbwe Regions : –snip–

Limiting the number of apps available

Both of these tasks give a lengthy listing, but all you need to know is the Appx package’s Nameofthepackage and the provisioned package’s DisplayName, as seen below.

Get-AppxPackage displaying detailsGet-AppxPackage displaying details

Getting a listing -appxprovisionedpackageGetting a listing -appxprovisionedpackage

Pipe the results through Choose-Object and select the Name and DisplayName attributes to make things a bit simpler. This will produce a list similar to the one below. This list is more manageable.

Select-Object Name | Get-AppxPackage

get-appxpackage | pick object name outputget-appxpackage | pick object name output

You can now check which Windows 10 applications you want to get rid of. At this stage, make a list of all the names of the packages you want to uninstall. One approach to accomplish this is to copy and paste the Windows 10 applications you want to remove and create a list this way. One technique I use is to save the findings to a text file, which I then open in Visual Studio Code. Consider the following scenario:

Select-Object Name | Get-AppxPackage | Out-File apps.txt | code apps.txt

Begin compiling a list of programs to delete in your external editor.

@ $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = $ProvisionedAppPackageNames ()

You may begin writing the PowerShell script now that you have the list.

Using PowerShell to Remove Windows 10 Apps

In your editor, you should now have an array created that includes the names of all the AppX packages you want to delete. I’ve included an example below.

@( $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = @( $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = @( $Provisioned “Microsoft.BingFinance” “Microsoft.BingNews” “Microsoft.BingSports” “Microsoft.BingFinance” “Microsoft.BingNews” “Microsoft.BingSports” “Microsoft.B “Microsoft.BingWeather” “Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub” “Microsoft.GetStarted” “microsoft.windowscommunicationsapps” “Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub” “Microsoft.GetStarted” # Calendar, Mail “Microsoft.Office.OneNote” “Microsoft.People” “Microsoft.SkypeApp” “Microsoft.Office.OneNote” “Microsoft.People” “Microsoft.SkypeApp” “Microsoft.XboxApp” “Microsoft.ZuneMusic” and “Microsoft.ZuneVideo”) are two Microsoft.Zune extensions.

You can now use the foreach loop to walk through each package to uninstall using the Remove-AppXProvisionedPackage cmdlet and the Remove-AppXPackage cmdlet, with the array supplied with the exact programs to be deleted.

$ProvisionedAppName in $ProvisionedAppPackageNames) for each ($ProvisionedAppName in $ProvisionedAppPackageNames) -Name Get-AppxPackage Remove-AppxPackage $ProvisionedAppName -AllUsers Where-Object DisplayName -EQ | Get-AppXProvisionedPackage -Online Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -Online $ProvisionedAppName

If you need to reinstall all programs for whatever reason, you may use the add-AppXPackage cmdlet to re-register the Windows 10 app by supplying its application manifest XML file, as seen below.

Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register “$(

The built-in applications in Windows 10 range from basic programs like Calculator and Weather to more task-oriented apps like Mail and Photos. While these built-in applications are great in most scenarios, they may be unsuitable, redundant, or unsupported in a business setting. These applications often provide a security concern. As a result, in this article, you’ll discover how to delete Windows 10 applications using PowerShell.

The issue is that uninstalling some of these programs is difficult for Microsoft. When utilizing standard removal techniques, there is no remove button. PowerShell is required to remove the built-in programs.

Please note that you do not need to remove all of the Windows 10 applications. Many are required for the Windows 10 “Experience,” while others, such as the.NET framework, are required by other apps. Choose your programs carefully while uninstalling them. You may, however, reinstall all of the programs, and you’ll find a PowerShell function for that at the conclusion of this post.

Using PowerShell to find Windows 10 apps

We will be dealing with two distinct types of apps.

  • AppX packages are pre-installed applications that come with the operating system.
  • AppX supplied packages – Applications installed during the initial creation of the user profile.

The first step is to make a list of all the applications that have been installed. Start PowerShell with elevated access and perform the Get-AppxPackage command. This will show you all of the AppX packages that are currently installed on Windows 10.

PS C:> Get-AppxPackage Name : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6 Publisher : CN=Microsoft Corporation, O=Microsoft Corporation, L=Redmond, S=Washington, C=US Architecture : X64 ResourceId : Version : 1.6.24903.0 PackageFullName : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_1.6.24903.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe InstallLocation : C:Program FilesWindowsAppsMicrosoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_1.6.24903.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe IsFramework : True PackageFamilyName : Microsoft.NET.Native.Framework.1.6_8wekyb3d8bbwe PublisherId : 8wekyb3d8bbwe IsResourcePackage : False IsBundle : False IsDevelopmentMode : False IsPartiallyStaged : False SignatureKind : Store Status : Ok –snip–

The supplied packages need the Online argument and have a somewhat different command. Instead of pulling packages from a local directory, the Online option retrieves packages from the current online operating system. This will provide a list of all the information for each package.

PS C:> Get-AppxProvisionedPackage -Online DisplayName : Microsoft.3DBuilder Version : 16.1.1431.0 Architecture : neutral ResourceId : ~ PackageName : Microsoft.3DBuilder_16.1.1431.0_neutral_~_8wekyb3d8bbwe Regions : DisplayName : Microsoft.BingWeather Version : 4.31.11905.0 Architecture : neutral ResourceId : ~ PackageName : Microsoft.BingWeather_4.31.11905.0_neutral_~_8wekyb3d8bbwe Regions : –snip–

Limiting the number of apps available

Both of these tasks give a lengthy listing, but all you need to know is the Appx package’s Nameofthepackage and the provisioned package’s DisplayName, as seen below.

Get-AppxPackage displaying detailsGet-AppxPackage displaying details

Getting a listing -appxprovisionedpackageGetting a listing -appxprovisionedpackage

Pipe the results through Choose-Object and select the Name and DisplayName attributes to make things a bit simpler. This will produce a list similar to the one below. This list is more manageable.

Select-Object Name | Get-AppxPackage

get-appxpackage | pick object name outputget-appxpackage | pick object name output

You can now check which Windows 10 applications you want to get rid of. At this stage, make a list of all the names of the packages you want to uninstall. One approach to accomplish this is to copy and paste the Windows 10 applications you want to remove and create a list this way. One technique I use is to save the findings to a text file, which I then open in Visual Studio Code. Consider the following scenario:

Select-Object Name | Get-AppxPackage | Out-File apps.txt | code apps.txt

Begin compiling a list of programs to delete in your external editor.

@ $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = $ProvisionedAppPackageNames ()

You may begin writing the PowerShell script now that you have the list.

Using PowerShell to Remove Windows 10 Apps

In your editor, you should now have an array created that includes the names of all the AppX packages you want to delete. I’ve included an example below.

@( $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = @( $ProvisionedAppPackageNames = @( $Provisioned “Microsoft.BingFinance” “Microsoft.BingNews” “Microsoft.BingSports” “Microsoft.BingFinance” “Microsoft.BingNews” “Microsoft.BingSports” “Microsoft.B “Microsoft.BingWeather” “Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub” “Microsoft.GetStarted” “microsoft.windowscommunicationsapps” “Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub” “Microsoft.GetStarted” # Calendar, Mail “Microsoft.Office.OneNote” “Microsoft.People” “Microsoft.SkypeApp” “Microsoft.Office.OneNote” “Microsoft.People” “Microsoft.SkypeApp” “Microsoft.XboxApp” “Microsoft.ZuneMusic” and “Microsoft.ZuneVideo”) are two Microsoft.Zune extensions.

You can now use the foreach loop to walk through each package to uninstall using the Remove-AppXProvisionedPackage cmdlet and the Remove-AppXPackage cmdlet, with the array supplied with the exact programs to be deleted.

$ProvisionedAppName in $ProvisionedAppPackageNames) for each ($ProvisionedAppName in $ProvisionedAppPackageNames) -Name Get-AppxPackage Remove-AppxPackage $ProvisionedAppName -AllUsers Where-Object DisplayName -EQ | Get-AppXProvisionedPackage -Online Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -Online $ProvisionedAppName

If you need to reinstall all programs for whatever reason, you may use the add-AppXPackage cmdlet to re-register the Windows 10 app by supplying its application manifest XML file, as seen below.

Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers | Foreach { Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register “$($_.InstallLocation)AppXManifest.xml” }

Summary

Even though Microsoft makes it difficult to remove Windows 10 programs, you can see that PowerShell is always available!

.InstallLocation)AppXManifest.xml” Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers | Foreach

Summary

Even though Microsoft makes it difficult to remove Windows 10 programs, you can see that PowerShell is always available!

One of the best ways to remove Windows 10 apps is through PowerShell. The “powershell script to uninstall all versions of application” will help you do this.

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