How to Find Running Processes with PowerShell’s Get

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The Get-Process cmdlet is a powerful tool that can be used to find running processes on your system. In this article, I will show you how to use the command with some examples of what it’s capable of and provide links for further reading.

The “powershell get-process details” is a command that allows users to find running processes with PowerShell. The process can be found by using the Get-Process cmdlet.

How to Find Running Processes with PowerShell's Get

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Another excellent example may be seen here. It utilizes the process’s ID (

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Below is another great example. For each instance of the brave process it finds, it uses that process’s ID ($_.id) and passes it to Get-NetTCPConnection. PowerShell then uses Get-NetTCPConnection to find information about each network connection the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Another excellent example may be seen here. It utilizes the process’s ID (

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Below is another great example. For each instance of the brave process it finds, it uses that process’s ID ($_.id) and passes it to Get-NetTCPConnection. PowerShell then uses Get-NetTCPConnection to find information about each network connection the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.id) and feeds it to Get-NetTCPConnection for each instance of the same process it finds. Get-NetTCPConnection is then used by PowerShell to obtain information on each network connection that the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Another excellent example may be seen here. It utilizes the process’s ID (

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Below is another great example. For each instance of the brave process it finds, it uses that process’s ID ($_.id) and passes it to Get-NetTCPConnection. PowerShell then uses Get-NetTCPConnection to find information about each network connection the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.id) and feeds it to Get-NetTCPConnection for each instance of the same process it finds. Get-NetTCPConnection is then used by PowerShell to obtain information on each network connection that the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.id) and feeds it to Get-NetTCPConnection for each instance of the same process it finds. Get-NetTCPConnection is then used by PowerShell to obtain information on each network connection that the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Another excellent example may be seen here. It utilizes the process’s ID (

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Below is another great example. For each instance of the brave process it finds, it uses that process’s ID ($_.id) and passes it to Get-NetTCPConnection. PowerShell then uses Get-NetTCPConnection to find information about each network connection the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.id) and feeds it to Get-NetTCPConnection for each instance of the same process it finds. Get-NetTCPConnection is then used by PowerShell to obtain information on each network connection that the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Another excellent example may be seen here. It utilizes the process’s ID (

Are you looking to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to list a system’s ongoing processes? You may use Get-Process to retrieve the process owner, process ID, and even the process’s location on disk.

Using real-world examples, you’ll learn how to utilize PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet in this tutorial. If manipulating processes on Windows or Linux to bend them to your will seems like fun, keep reading!

Related: Using ps, pgrep, pkill, and Other Linux Commands to Kill a Process

Prerequisites

Before continuing, make sure you have the following requirements in order to follow along with the examples in this tutorial.

Upgrading to PowerShell 7: A Step-by-Step Guide

  • This post utilizes Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, although PowerShell will function on any OS that supports it.

Ready? Let’s get started managing some processes!

Processes that are now running are shown.

Get-Process is a command that handles local processes. The PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet is used in this first example. This command gives a list of all currently active processes.

Get-Process delivers a snapshot of a system’s running processes at a certain moment in time. Windows Task Manager and Linux’s top command may both be used to view real-time process information.

To get started, execute Get-Process from your PowerShell terminal. Get-Process delivers the information about the currently running process, as seen below. For both Windows and Linux, the output format is the same.

To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.To show local processes on Windows, use the Get-Process cmdlet.

Get-Process is aliased by the commands gps and ps by default. The ps command clashes with a built-in Linux command since PowerShell 7 is cross-platform. As a result, only the gps alias will operate on Linux, not ps.

It’s possible that the significance of Get-Process output isn’t immediately evident. The Get-Process default properties are detailed in further detail below.

  • NPM(K) – The amount of non-paged memory that a process is utilizing, as indicated by the (K) notation, in kilobytes.
  • PM(M) — The amount of pageable memory in megabytes that a process is utilizing, as denoted by the (M) notation.
  • WS(M) — The size of the process’s working set, expressed in megabytes. The working set is made up of the pages of memory that the process has recently referred to.
  • VM(M) – The amount of virtual memory in megabytes that the process is consuming. On-disk paging file storage is included.
  • CPU(S) — The total amount of processor time required by the process across all processes, in seconds.
  • Id – The process’s process ID (PID).
  • The running process’s Session Identifier is SI. Session 0 denotes that the process is open to all users, whereas Session 1 denotes that the process is only available to the first signed in user, and so on.
  • ProcessName — The executing process’s name.

Use the Get-Process | Get-Member -MemberType ‘AliasProperty’ command to get a list of property aliases that are mapped to full property names.

Below is another great example. For each instance of the brave process it finds, it uses that process’s ID ($_.id) and passes it to Get-NetTCPConnection. PowerShell then uses Get-NetTCPConnection to find information about each network connection the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.id) and feeds it to Get-NetTCPConnection for each instance of the same process it finds. Get-NetTCPConnection is then used by PowerShell to obtain information on each network connection that the brave process has open.

When the Brave browser is open, execute the following code in your PowerShell session.

Get-Process -Name brave | ForEach-Object { Get-NetTCPConnection -OwningProcess $_.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

.Id -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

Thank you to SystemFrontier’s Jay Adams!

Congratulations, you can now use Get-Process to examine all running processes on both Windows and Linux!

Identifying Specific Process Characteristics

As you can see, Get-Process returns a variety of properties about running processes. You may choose attributes on objects in the same way you do with other PowerShell objects.

Let’s have a look at a basic example of how to get certain characteristics for a single process:

  1. Open your Windows calculator program.

2. Open a PowerShell prompt and execute Get-Process with the Name option to only reveal processes with the name Calculator. The output will be the same as it was before.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name

As predicted, Get-Process returns a large number of attributes. Perhaps you simply want to look at the number in the CPU(s) column to see how much CPU is being used. Use parentheses to surround the Get-Process statement and reference the CPU property as seen below. You’ll see that it just returns the CPU property’s value.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU

Get-Process returns a name named CPU(s), but the code sample before just utilized the term CPU. The actual property name isn’t always shown in PowerShell’s output. A PS1XML formatting file is used to implement this notion.

The total CPU time is represented as a number of seconds divided by the number of cores. To make it more human-readable, use the following Math procedure to round it to the closest tenth.

$cpu = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).CPU [math]::Round($cpu,2)

Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.Across all cores, the calculator process uses less than 1 second of CPU time.

You may use the same method to discover any additional attributes, such as Id, if you simply want to view a process’ ID.

Allow the Calculator program to operate in the background. For the rest of the examples, you’ll be utilizing this application.

Memory Usage in the Retrieving Process

Slow-running systems may be difficult to troubleshoot, with memory constraints often being the culprit. Return to the Calculator app and retrieve the Calculator process, just showing the VM property. The RAM consumed is indicated in megabytes, as seen below (MB).

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM

The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.The memory utilization of the Calculator process is shown.

Use the built-in PowerShell conversion multipliers to convert megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) to better understand memory use (GB). In the example below, you’ll convert the RAM utilized to GB and then round the amount using the.NET math library Round function, as seen in the picture below.

$ProcessMemoryGB = (Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).VM $ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB # Use the .NET Math type Round method [Math]::Round($ProcessMemoryGB / 1GB)

The result is simpler to read when the values are converted using built-in PowerShell tools. Continue reading to understand how to find a process’s ID.

Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.Converting the memory use of the calculator process to a rounded GB format.

Bringing Lesser-Known Properties to Light

Get-Process does not contain or display all attributes by default. Learn more about the Path and UserName attributes, as well as how to utilize them, in the sections below.

Identifying the Location of a Process Binary

A process executable may be stored in a variety of locations on a system. Despite Path not appearing by default, Get-Process makes discovering the process file system path straightforward if a process is actively executing. The Path field contains the filesystem location of the process executable, as seen below.

(Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name).Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Windows.On Windows, Get-Process may be used to reveal the complete file system path of a process.

Get-Process in Linux, like Get-Process in Windows, returns the filesystem path. The gnome-calculator process is running in the example below, with the path shown in the console output.

(Get-Process gnome-calculator -Name) Path

Using Get-Process to display a process's full file system path on Linux.On Linux, Get-Process may be used to show the complete file system path of a process.

A clever bad actor could call a procedure the same as or similar to a well-known one. As a result, in a security incident response (IR) situation, the ability to determine the filesystem path is beneficial. Because UserName is not included in the usual output, continue reading to learn how to find the process owner.

Tracking Down the Process Owner

You’ll need to utilize the IncludeUserName argument to include the UserName value in the output. It’s crucial to know who owns a process, particularly if you don’t want to accidentally kill another user’s. The UserName attribute is now included in the process output, as illustrated below.

Get-Process ‘Calculator’ -Name -IncludeUserName

On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.On Windows, the owner of the Calculator process is shown.

Finally, keep reading to discover how to receive process information from a remote machine using Get-Process!

Locating Remote Computer Processes

Although Get-Process does not have any remote capabilities in Windows PowerShell, you may use PowerShell Remoting and the Invoke-Command to execute it on distant systems.

PSRemoting with Windows and Linux: How to Set It Up

However, if you’re using Linux or PowerShell 6+ on Windows, you may now query processes on distant systems using the ComputerName option.

Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ -ProcessName ‘process’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote computer name’ Get-Process -ComputerName’remote_

When the Get-Process command is executed against a distant machine, the same result is shown as if it were done locally.

An example of remoting to another machine and obtaining running processes is shown below:

Using a Computer and Getting Processes to RunUsing a Computer and Getting Processes to Run

You may use a comma to separate several computers, such as Get-Process -ComputerName SRV1,SRV2.

Steps to Follow

You learnt how to use the PowerShell Get-Process cmdlet to discover running processes on local and remote Linux and Windows machines in this tutorial.

What will you do now that you’ve gained this knowledge? To end a process received by Get-Process, try giving it to Stop-Process on a local or remote machine.

The “powershell get-process start time” is a command that can be used to find running processes. It will return the process name, start time and more information.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I find out what processes are running in Windows?

A: You can find out what processes are running on your computer by using the top command.
C:\top >
Process name=thsvc, Process ID = 1068
PID Type Name (starting with)
1068 THSVIRUN6.EXE 0+0 unknown

How do you find the PID Process?

A: If you are on a PC, this is usually found in your taskbar. If you have no idea what I mean by PID Process or task bar, simply open up the start menu and type processes or services.

How do you check what PowerShell is doing?

A: You can use a tool called the Get-Command which will show you all commands in your PowerShell session.

Related Tags

  • powershell kill process
  • powershell start-process
  • powershell check if process is running on remote computer
  • powershell get-process remote computer
  • powershell get-process command line

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