Building an Active Directory Password Reset Tool with PowerShell

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Microsoft recently released a new tool for resetting passwords in Active Directory. The PowerShell script takes advantage of the cmdlet New-ADObject, which is used to create objects within an ADIAM directory.

This article will show you how to build an Active Directory Password Reset Tool with PowerShell. You will need to use the “set-adaccountpassword” command and a few other commands in order to get it done.

Building an Active Directory Password Reset Tool with PowerShell

Active Directory (AD) user password reset is probably one of the most common calls to your service desk. Building an Active Directory password reset tool would make it easier for your service desk and administrators to manage these requests.

Fortunately, several PowerShell cmdlets help you control many parts of Active Directory, including password resets. In this post, you’ll learn how to create an Active Directory password reset tool using PowerShell.

Specops Software has generously sponsored this content. Check out their password reset tool for more additional features that you can implement with a simple PowerShell script!

Prerequisites

No tool may be built without first completing the necessary prerequisites. You’ll need the following items to follow along with this article:

  • A Windows machine connected to an Active Directory domain on which you’ll create and execute your programs.
    • On the PC, the ActiveDirectory module must be installed.
    • Windows PowerShell 5.1 must also be installed on the machine.

Related: (All the Ways!) to Check Your PowerShell Version

  • Visual Studio Code or Windows PowerShell ISE are examples of script editors. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this article.

In Active Directory, locate the user.

You must first locate the account before you can reset the password. The first thing you should do is see whether an account already exists. To do so, use the Get-ADUser cmdlet with the Identity argument set to the account’s name.

The differentiated name, GUID (objectGUID), A security identifier (objectSid), or SAM account name are all valid identifiers for the Identity parameter (sAMAccountName).

If you get a request to reset the password for user a, for example, you should first verify that the user exists before proceeding. To do so, copy and paste the command below into your PowerShell terminal. Make sure you’re using the right user name first.

-Identity user a Get-ADUser

The command returned the user attributes, as seen in the picture below, validating that the account exists and that the username is accurate.

Locating a User in Active DirectoryLocating a User in Active Directory

Get-AdUser — Using PowerShell to find Active Directory users

Password Reset for Active Directory Users

You know the result is unique and that the user account exists now that you know how to verify a user account using Get-ADUser. You must now use the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet to reset the user’s password.

If you additionally specify the previous password, the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet resets a user’s password. If you don’t have the previous password, the cmdlet uses the Reset option to create a new one.

The code below will reset the password for user a. The new password will be a 12-character long random password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

Open a PowerShell window, copy the code, paste it in, then hit Enter to run it.

Related: How to Make a Password Generator at Random

# Enter the username whose password needs to be reset. ‘user a’ as $username # Install the system. .NET Web assembly ‘System.Web’ Add-Type -AssemblyName # Create a 12-character password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters at random. [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword $randomPassword (12, 5) # Convert the password from plain text to a secure string. ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force $newPassword = $randomPassword # Password reset for the user -Identity Set-ADAccountPassword -NewPassword $username -Reset $newPassword # The new password will be shown. $randomPassword

The intended outcome after executing the code is shown in the image below.

Changing the user's password to a complicated, random passwordChanging the user’s password to a complicated, random password

You now have a script that can be used to reset a user’s password. The next step is to make your script a tool. A tool is reusable and performs the same set of tasks with the least amount of manual intervention.

One thing to keep in mind while creating a tool is that the person who will use it should not have to update the code every time. So far, your code needs the user to change the value of $username.

Why not develop a script that takes parameters instead of allowing your tool users to update the variables manually? Follow these steps to do so:

Related:Your Powershell Functions Getting Started Guide

  1. On your PC, launch the script editor of your choice. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this lesson.
  2. Make a new file with the name Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 and save it. Save the script anywhere you want it. The file is saved in the C:scripts folder in this tutorial.
  3. Copy and paste the code below into your script editor, then save the script. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

# Create a username parameter. $username param # Display a message and quit the script if the user did not give a username value. If (-not($username)) is true, Create-Host “You failed to provide a username. Script termination “$null is returned. # Verify that the user exists and that the username is correct. Do not display the outcome on the screen. try Get-ADUser -Identity $null Stop $username -ErrorAction # Display a notice and quit the script if the username cannot be found. catch

Active Directory (AD) user password reset is probably one of the most common calls to your service desk. Building an Active Directory password reset tool would make it easier for your service desk and administrators to manage these requests.

Fortunately, several PowerShell cmdlets help you control many parts of Active Directory, including password resets. In this post, you’ll learn how to create an Active Directory password reset tool using PowerShell.

Specops Software has generously sponsored this content. Check out their password reset tool for more additional features that you can implement with a simple PowerShell script!

Prerequisites

No tool may be built without first completing the necessary prerequisites. You’ll need the following items to follow along with this article:

  • A Windows machine connected to an Active Directory domain on which you’ll create and execute your programs.
    • On the PC, the ActiveDirectory module must be installed.
    • Windows PowerShell 5.1 must also be installed on the machine.

Related: (All the Ways!) to Check Your PowerShell Version

  • Visual Studio Code or Windows PowerShell ISE are examples of script editors. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this article.

In Active Directory, locate the user.

You must first locate the account before you can reset the password. The first thing you should do is see whether an account already exists. To do so, use the Get-ADUser cmdlet with the Identity argument set to the account’s name.

The differentiated name, GUID (objectGUID), A security identifier (objectSid), or SAM account name are all valid identifiers for the Identity parameter (sAMAccountName).

If you get a request to reset the password for user a, for example, you should first verify that the user exists before proceeding. To do so, copy and paste the command below into your PowerShell terminal. Make sure you’re using the right user name first.

-Identity user a Get-ADUser

The command returned the user attributes, as seen in the picture below, validating that the account exists and that the username is accurate.

Locating a User in Active DirectoryLocating a User in Active Directory

Get-AdUser — Using PowerShell to find Active Directory users

Password Reset for Active Directory Users

You know the result is unique and that the user account exists now that you know how to verify a user account using Get-ADUser. You must now use the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet to reset the user’s password.

If you additionally specify the previous password, the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet resets a user’s password. If you don’t have the previous password, the cmdlet uses the Reset option to create a new one.

The code below will reset the password for user a. The new password will be a 12-character long random password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

Open a PowerShell window, copy the code, paste it in, then hit Enter to run it.

Related: How to Make a Password Generator at Random

# Enter the username whose password needs to be reset. ‘user a’ as $username # Install the system. .NET Web assembly ‘System.Web’ Add-Type -AssemblyName # Create a 12-character password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters at random. [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword $randomPassword (12, 5) # Convert the password from plain text to a secure string. ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force $newPassword = $randomPassword # Password reset for the user -Identity Set-ADAccountPassword -NewPassword $username -Reset $newPassword # The new password will be shown. $randomPassword

The intended outcome after executing the code is shown in the image below.

Changing the user's password to a complicated, random passwordChanging the user’s password to a complicated, random password

You now have a script that can be used to reset a user’s password. The next step is to make your script a tool. A tool is reusable and performs the same set of tasks with the least amount of manual intervention.

One thing to keep in mind while creating a tool is that the person who will use it should not have to update the code every time. So far, your code needs the user to change the value of $username.

Why not develop a script that takes parameters instead of allowing your tool users to update the variables manually? Follow these steps to do so:

Related:Your Powershell Functions Getting Started Guide

  1. On your PC, launch the script editor of your choice. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this lesson.
  2. Make a new file with the name Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 and save it. Save the script anywhere you want it. The file is saved in the C:scripts folder in this tutorial.
  3. Copy and paste the code below into your script editor, then save the script. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

# Add a parameter called username. param ( $username ) # If the user did not provide a username value, show a message and exit the script. if (-not($username)) { Write-Host “You did not enter a username. Exiting script” return $null } # Check if the user exists or if the username is valid. Do not show the result on the screen. try { $null = Get-ADUser -Identity $username -ErrorAction Stop } # If the username cannot be found, show a message and exit the script. catch { Write-Host $_.Exception.Message return $null } # Generate a random password that is 12-characters long with five non-AlphaNumeric characters. $randomPassword = [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword(12, 5) # Convert the plain text password to a secure string. $newPassword = $randomPassword | ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force # Try to reset the user’s password try { # Reset the user’s password Set-ADAccountPassword -Identity $username -NewPassword $newPassword -Reset -ErrorAction Stop # Force the user to change password during the next log in Set-ADuser -Identity $username -ChangePasswordAtLogon $true # If the password reset was successfull, return the username and new password. [pscustomobject]@{ Username = $username NewPassword = $randomPassword } } # If the password reset failed, show a message and exit the script. catch { Write-Host “There was an error performing the password reset. Please consult the error below.” Write-host $_.Exception.Message return $null }

How do you make sure your Active Directory password reset tool works now that you have it? Use PowerShell to execute it.

More on how to run a PowerShell script from the command line

A PowerShell console pane is already accessible if you’re using Windows PowerShell ISE. If not, you’ll need to start a new PowerShell session. Change the current working directory to the same location where you stored the script, such as Set-Location C:scripts, in either case.

Password Reset for a Single User

Assume you need to change the password of one user. Run the Active Directory password reset tool and choose the username you want to reset the password for. Run the script as indicated below to reset a single user’s password.

-username user a.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1

As a consequence, the script resets the password and shows it on the screen. The new password may be copied from this output and given to the affected user.

Resetting a valid user's passwordPassword reset for a valid user

Resetting Multiple Users’ Passwords

What if you need to change passwords for a large number of people? Does this imply you’ll have to use the Active Directory password reset tool many times? Yes, technically, but not by hand.

Fortunately, you can use arrays and the foreach loop in PowerShell to cycle over a list. The ForEach-Object cmdlet in PowerShell allows you to process multiple things. You may use this cmdlet to send several things through the pipeline.

Create an array containing two or more usernames to reset the passwords of multiple users. The array objects are then sent through the pipeline, where the ForEach-Object cmdlet executes the password reset tool on each username.

@(‘user a’,’user b’) |.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem

Your AD password reset tool reset two user passwords as shown below.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords in an arrayResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords in an array

Back to the Basics with PowerShell’s Foreach Loop

If you’re reading a list of usernames from a text file, the same principle applies. Perhaps you have a text file titled users.txt with the usernames, similar to the one below.

A text file containing a list of usernamesA text file containing a list of usernames

You must read the user account text file and use your AD password reset tool on each one. Use the Get-Content cmdlet to import the content of the text file into PowerShell. After that, send the data to the pipeline and utilize the Active Directory password reset tool on each username.

ForEach-Object.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem | Get-Content.users.txt

You will have reset several user passwords in one operation after executing the command.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords from a text fileResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords from a text file

Get-Content in PowerShell: Reading Text Files Like a Boss

Investigating Specops uReset

Creating your own Active Directory password reset tool provides a lot of advantages. You’ll provide your front-line agents a tool that performs a certain task, which they may use individually or in bulk.

However, having such a facility does not assist lower the number of requests for password resets from users. Instead of dealing with more challenging problems, your support desk may get overwhelmed with password reset requests. As a result, you may wish to check into third-party programs that allow you to reset your password yourself.

Specops uReset is one such fantastic utility. Users may unlock, alter, and reset their passwords using Specops uReset. With sufficient user education, this function might drastically reduce service desk password request calls.

You may also combine Specops uReset with current multi-factor authentication (MFA) systems or identity suppliers. Users may utilize this tool to safely conduct password-related operations.

The service desk may utilize Specops uReset to validate the user’s account using their preferred identity provider. Alternatively, a message may be sent to the user’s registered cellphone number. This Specops uReset function may considerably enhance impersonation and social engineering assault defenses.

In terms of data security, Specops uReset does not save passwords or other sensitive information. All password-related information is stored in your Active Directory.

Specops uReset definitely outperforms a PowerShell-based password reset solution in terms of functionality. Is it fair to compare a full-featured third-party utility such as Specops uReset to a PowerShell program that does a single task?

What are your thoughts? For me, it comes down to balancing the need (for the features) with the capacity (to buy). However, whether or not your pick will provide value will ultimately be determined by you or your business.

.Exception.Message return $null Write-Host # Create a 12-character password that includes five non-AlphaNumeric characters. [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword $randomPassword (12, 5) # Convert the password from plain text to a secure string. ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force $newPassword = $randomPassword # Reset the user’s password -Identity Set-ADAccountPassword -NewPassword $username -Reset -ErrorAction Stop $newPassword # Make the user change their password the next time they check in. -Identity Set-ADuser -ChangePasswordAtLogon $username $true # Return the username and new password if the password reset was successful. [pscustomobject] NewPassword = $randomPassword @ Username = $username # Display a notice and quit the script if the password reset fails. catch Create-Host “The password reset failed due to an issue. Please see the error message below ”

Active Directory (AD) user password reset is probably one of the most common calls to your service desk. Building an Active Directory password reset tool would make it easier for your service desk and administrators to manage these requests.

Fortunately, several PowerShell cmdlets help you control many parts of Active Directory, including password resets. In this post, you’ll learn how to create an Active Directory password reset tool using PowerShell.

Specops Software has generously sponsored this content. Check out their password reset tool for more additional features that you can implement with a simple PowerShell script!

Prerequisites

No tool may be built without first completing the necessary prerequisites. You’ll need the following items to follow along with this article:

  • A Windows machine connected to an Active Directory domain on which you’ll create and execute your programs.
    • On the PC, the ActiveDirectory module must be installed.
    • Windows PowerShell 5.1 must also be installed on the machine.

Related: (All the Ways!) to Check Your PowerShell Version

  • Visual Studio Code or Windows PowerShell ISE are examples of script editors. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this article.

In Active Directory, locate the user.

You must first locate the account before you can reset the password. The first thing you should do is see whether an account already exists. To do so, use the Get-ADUser cmdlet with the Identity argument set to the account’s name.

The differentiated name, GUID (objectGUID), A security identifier (objectSid), or SAM account name are all valid identifiers for the Identity parameter (sAMAccountName).

If you get a request to reset the password for user a, for example, you should first verify that the user exists before proceeding. To do so, copy and paste the command below into your PowerShell terminal. Make sure you’re using the right user name first.

-Identity user a Get-ADUser

The command returned the user attributes, as seen in the picture below, validating that the account exists and that the username is accurate.

Locating a User in Active DirectoryLocating a User in Active Directory

Get-AdUser — Using PowerShell to find Active Directory users

Password Reset for Active Directory Users

You know the result is unique and that the user account exists now that you know how to verify a user account using Get-ADUser. You must now use the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet to reset the user’s password.

If you additionally specify the previous password, the Set-ADAccountPassword cmdlet resets a user’s password. If you don’t have the previous password, the cmdlet uses the Reset option to create a new one.

The code below will reset the password for user a. The new password will be a 12-character long random password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

Open a PowerShell window, copy the code, paste it in, then hit Enter to run it.

Related: How to Make a Password Generator at Random

# Enter the username whose password needs to be reset. ‘user a’ as $username # Install the system. .NET Web assembly ‘System.Web’ Add-Type -AssemblyName # Create a 12-character password with five non-AlphaNumeric characters at random. [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword $randomPassword (12, 5) # Convert the password from plain text to a secure string. ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force $newPassword = $randomPassword # Password reset for the user -Identity Set-ADAccountPassword -NewPassword $username -Reset $newPassword # The new password will be shown. $randomPassword

The intended outcome after executing the code is shown in the image below.

Changing the user's password to a complicated, random passwordChanging the user’s password to a complicated, random password

You now have a script that can be used to reset a user’s password. The next step is to make your script a tool. A tool is reusable and performs the same set of tasks with the least amount of manual intervention.

One thing to keep in mind while creating a tool is that the person who will use it should not have to update the code every time. So far, your code needs the user to change the value of $username.

Why not develop a script that takes parameters instead of allowing your tool users to update the variables manually? Follow these steps to do so:

Related:Your Powershell Functions Getting Started Guide

  1. On your PC, launch the script editor of your choice. The Windows PowerShell ISE is used in this lesson.
  2. Make a new file with the name Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 and save it. Save the script anywhere you want it. The file is saved in the C:scripts folder in this tutorial.
  3. Copy and paste the code below into your script editor, then save the script. Each line’s explanation may be found in the code comments.

# Add a parameter called username. param ( $username ) # If the user did not provide a username value, show a message and exit the script. if (-not($username)) { Write-Host “You did not enter a username. Exiting script” return $null } # Check if the user exists or if the username is valid. Do not show the result on the screen. try { $null = Get-ADUser -Identity $username -ErrorAction Stop } # If the username cannot be found, show a message and exit the script. catch { Write-Host $_.Exception.Message return $null } # Generate a random password that is 12-characters long with five non-AlphaNumeric characters. $randomPassword = [System.Web.Security.Membership]::GeneratePassword(12, 5) # Convert the plain text password to a secure string. $newPassword = $randomPassword | ConvertTo-SecureString -AsPlainText -Force # Try to reset the user’s password try { # Reset the user’s password Set-ADAccountPassword -Identity $username -NewPassword $newPassword -Reset -ErrorAction Stop # Force the user to change password during the next log in Set-ADuser -Identity $username -ChangePasswordAtLogon $true # If the password reset was successfull, return the username and new password. [pscustomobject]@{ Username = $username NewPassword = $randomPassword } } # If the password reset failed, show a message and exit the script. catch { Write-Host “There was an error performing the password reset. Please consult the error below.” Write-host $_.Exception.Message return $null }

How do you make sure your Active Directory password reset tool works now that you have it? Use PowerShell to execute it.

More on how to run a PowerShell script from the command line

A PowerShell console pane is already accessible if you’re using Windows PowerShell ISE. If not, you’ll need to start a new PowerShell session. Change the current working directory to the same location where you stored the script, such as Set-Location C:scripts, in either case.

Password Reset for a Single User

Assume you need to change the password of one user. Run the Active Directory password reset tool and choose the username you want to reset the password for. Run the script as indicated below to reset a single user’s password.

-username user a.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1

As a consequence, the script resets the password and shows it on the screen. The new password may be copied from this output and given to the affected user.

Resetting a valid user's passwordPassword reset for a valid user

Resetting Multiple Users’ Passwords

What if you need to change passwords for a large number of people? Does this imply you’ll have to use the Active Directory password reset tool many times? Yes, technically, but not by hand.

Fortunately, you can use arrays and the foreach loop in PowerShell to cycle over a list. The ForEach-Object cmdlet in PowerShell allows you to process multiple things. You may use this cmdlet to send several things through the pipeline.

Create an array containing two or more usernames to reset the passwords of multiple users. The array objects are then sent through the pipeline, where the ForEach-Object cmdlet executes the password reset tool on each username.

@(‘user a’,’user b’) |.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem

Your AD password reset tool reset two user passwords as shown below.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords in an arrayResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords in an array

Back to the Basics with PowerShell’s Foreach Loop

If you’re reading a list of usernames from a text file, the same principle applies. Perhaps you have a text file titled users.txt with the usernames, similar to the one below.

A text file containing a list of usernamesA text file containing a list of usernames

You must read the user account text file and use your AD password reset tool on each one. Use the Get-Content cmdlet to import the content of the text file into PowerShell. After that, send the data to the pipeline and utilize the Active Directory password reset tool on each username.

ForEach-Object.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem | Get-Content.users.txt

You will have reset several user passwords in one operation after executing the command.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords from a text fileResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords from a text file

Get-Content in PowerShell: Reading Text Files Like a Boss

Investigating Specops uReset

Creating your own Active Directory password reset tool provides a lot of advantages. You’ll provide your front-line agents a tool that performs a certain task, which they may use individually or in bulk.

However, having such a facility does not assist lower the number of requests for password resets from users. Instead of dealing with more challenging problems, your support desk may get overwhelmed with password reset requests. As a result, you may wish to check into third-party programs that allow you to reset your password yourself.

Specops uReset is one such fantastic utility. Users may unlock, alter, and reset their passwords using Specops uReset. With sufficient user education, this function might drastically reduce service desk password request calls.

You may also combine Specops uReset with current multi-factor authentication (MFA) systems or identity suppliers. Users may utilize this tool to safely conduct password-related operations.

The service desk may utilize Specops uReset to validate the user’s account using their preferred identity provider. Alternatively, a message may be sent to the user’s registered cellphone number. This Specops uReset function may considerably enhance impersonation and social engineering assault defenses.

In terms of data security, Specops uReset does not save passwords or other sensitive information. All password-related information is stored in your Active Directory.

Specops uReset definitely outperforms a PowerShell-based password reset solution in terms of functionality. Is it fair to compare a full-featured third-party utility such as Specops uReset to a PowerShell program that does a single task?

What are your thoughts? For me, it comes down to balancing the need (for the features) with the capacity (to buy). However, whether or not your pick will provide value will ultimately be determined by you or your business.

.Exception.Message return $null write-host

How do you make sure your Active Directory password reset tool works now that you have it? Use PowerShell to execute it.

More on how to run a PowerShell script from the command line

A PowerShell console pane is already accessible if you’re using Windows PowerShell ISE. If not, you’ll need to start a new PowerShell session. Change the current working directory to the same location where you stored the script, such as Set-Location C:scripts, in either case.

Password Reset for a Single User

Assume you need to change the password of one user. Run the Active Directory password reset tool and choose the username you want to reset the password for. Run the script as indicated below to reset a single user’s password.

-username user a.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1

As a consequence, the script resets the password and shows it on the screen. The new password may be copied from this output and given to the affected user.

Resetting a valid user's passwordPassword reset for a valid user

Resetting Multiple Users’ Passwords

What if you need to change passwords for a large number of people? Does this imply you’ll have to use the Active Directory password reset tool many times? Yes, technically, but not by hand.

Fortunately, you can use arrays and the foreach loop in PowerShell to cycle over a list. The ForEach-Object cmdlet in PowerShell allows you to process multiple things. You may use this cmdlet to send several things through the pipeline.

Create an array containing two or more usernames to reset the passwords of multiple users. The array objects are then sent through the pipeline, where the ForEach-Object cmdlet executes the password reset tool on each username.

@(‘user a’,’user b’) |.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem

Your AD password reset tool reset two user passwords as shown below.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords in an arrayResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords in an array

Back to the Basics with PowerShell’s Foreach Loop

If you’re reading a list of usernames from a text file, the same principle applies. Perhaps you have a text file titled users.txt with the usernames, similar to the one below.

A text file containing a list of usernamesA text file containing a list of usernames

You must read the user account text file and use your AD password reset tool on each one. Use the Get-Content cmdlet to import the content of the text file into PowerShell. After that, send the data to the pipeline and utilize the Active Directory password reset tool on each username.

ForEach-Object.Reset-ADUserPassword.ps1 -username $PSItem | Get-Content.users.txt

You will have reset several user passwords in one operation after executing the command.

Resetting Multiple Users' Passwords from a text fileResetting Multiple Users’ Passwords from a text file

Get-Content in PowerShell: Reading Text Files Like a Boss

Investigating Specops uReset

Creating your own Active Directory password reset tool provides a lot of advantages. You’ll provide your front-line agents a tool that performs a certain task, which they may use individually or in bulk.

However, having such a facility does not assist lower the number of requests for password resets from users. Instead of dealing with more challenging problems, your support desk may get overwhelmed with password reset requests. As a result, you may wish to check into third-party programs that allow you to reset your password yourself.

Specops uReset is one such fantastic utility. Users may unlock, alter, and reset their passwords using Specops uReset. With sufficient user education, this function might drastically reduce service desk password request calls.

You may also combine Specops uReset with current multi-factor authentication (MFA) systems or identity suppliers. Users may utilize this tool to safely conduct password-related operations.

The service desk may utilize Specops uReset to validate the user’s account using their preferred identity provider. Alternatively, a message may be sent to the user’s registered cellphone number. This Specops uReset function may considerably enhance impersonation and social engineering assault defenses.

In terms of data security, Specops uReset does not save passwords or other sensitive information. All password-related information is stored in your Active Directory.

Specops uReset definitely outperforms a PowerShell-based password reset solution in terms of functionality. Is it fair to compare a full-featured third-party utility such as Specops uReset to a PowerShell program that does a single task?

What are your thoughts? For me, it comes down to balancing the need (for the features) with the capacity (to buy). However, whether or not your pick will provide value will ultimately be determined by you or your business.

The “active directory self-service password reset” is a tool that allows users to reset their passwords without having to wait for help desk support. This article walks through the process of building an Active Directory Password Reset Tool with PowerShell.

Related Tags

  • active directory password reset tool open source
  • self-service password reset powershell script
  • powershell password reset gui
  • script to reset password in active directory for multiple users
  • automate password resets using windows powershell