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Resolve is a command line tool that allows users to check their credit score, and also get a copy of their credit report. It’s one of the most helpful tools for checking your credit history. Read more in detail here: resolve credit.

Resolve

If you manage web or mail servers, you know how important it is to have properly set DNS records. Missing DNS records may result in a variety of issues, such as people being unable to access your website or emails not being sent. It’s a good thing the PowerShell Resolve-DnsName cmdlet exists, since it allows you to automate DNS record monitoring using scripting.

An administrator’s day is already hectic enough, and manually verifying whether DNS entries can be resolved correctly adds to the workload.

In this article, you’ll discover what the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet does and how to use it in PowerShell to query DNS records. You’ll also learn how to develop a rudimentary script to generate a report of your nominated DNS records to monitor at the Conclusion of this article.

Prerequisites

This is a walkthrough, so if you want to follow along with the examples, you’ll need the following:

The DNS Resolver in PowerShell is called Resolve-DnsName.

A DNS query may be done in a variety of ways. The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is analogous to Windows’ nslookup command-line utility, or the dig command if you’re a Linux administrator.

DNS record monitoring and reporting services are available on several websites. These third-party services, however, almost always come at a fee. There is a free option that also enables you to demonstrate your scripting abilities!

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet translates DNS names to IP addresses and vice versa, as its name indicates. This cmdlet is part of the dnsclient PowerShell module, which is included with Windows 10, Windows Server 2012/R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019 as of this writing.

Resolve-DnsName returns objects that may be saved, altered, and exported since it is a PowerShell cmdlet. For example, executing the command Resolve-DnsName google.com to seek for the DNS record for google.com results in the output displayed below.

Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.

The result was delivered as an object, which you can use to export the data to a CSV file or change the format to generate HTML reports.

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is not the same as the previous nslookup command. The result of nslookup is a simple string. In the screenshot below, you can see an example. It will be difficult to extract any of this information.

nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslooknslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslook

Querying DNS Records of Various Types

By default, Resolve-DnsName looks for DNS records with the A and AAAA suffixes. If you use the command below to search for the DNS record for gmail.com, for example:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName

Only the AAAA and A records are returned, as seen below. This is due to the fact that the kind of DNS record to search for was not provided.

Given that gmail.com is a domain used by Google’s email service, an MX record must be connected with it, right? There’s no need to guess when you may use this command to confirm:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName -Type MX

The MX record list for gmail.com is seen in the output in the image below.

Visit this page and check for the table for the -Type argument to learn more about the various record kinds that may be used with Resolve-DnsName. You may also use the command get-help Resolve-DnsName to get the Resolve-DnsName help.

Using Specific DNS Lookup Servers

By default, Resolve-DnsName utilizes the DNS server addresses that are specified on your computer. However, you may direct Resolve-DnsName to utilize a specified DNS server for lookups.

For example, if you wish to lookup records using Google Public DNS, you may do so by using the -Server argument in your command, as seen below.

$dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8’,’8 adamtheautomator.com Resolve-DnsName -Server $dnsServer

The command above would provide a result similar to the one seen in the picture below.

Results of a DNS record query using a certain DNS serverResults of a DNS record query using a certain DNS server

“Why would I need to utilize a separate DNS server?” you may be thinking at this point. That is a legitimate concern. You’ll probably receive the same result whether you use your machine’s default DNS server or another DNS server to seek for the same record.

There might be a variety of reasons to utilize Resolve-DnsName with distinct DNS servers. These are some of the possible reasons:

  • Speed – Some DNS servers are likely to be more responsive than others.
  • Security – Some DNS servers may have stronger security mechanisms in place to protect against hijacking and assaults than others.
  • Records availability — In most cases, businesses have their own internal DNS servers that house zones and records for names that are only resolved inside the company. In this situation, using a public DNS server to search for an internal name would fail.

Failure to search up a DNS recordFailure to search up a DNS record

  • Requests are not being sent by DNS servers – DNS forwarding is not permitted in certain companies. Using them to search for public DNS records will result in a failure.
  • Troubleshooting and Testing — If your preferred DNS servers aren’t working, try testing your lookups with another DNS server.

Using a PowerShell Script to Report DNS Records

Now that you know how to use the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet, you’ll learn how to develop a PowerShell script to monitor and report DNS entries in this section. You should be able to create this script using the information you’ve obtained in the previous parts.

Create a new file called GetDnsRecord.ps1 in your preferred script editor.

The Variables Must Be Defined

Determine which variables will be used first. The following are some of the factors that will be considered:

  • $NameList – The names of the DNS records you want your script to query will be stored in this variable.
  • $Serverlist – This variable is used to provide the DNS servers that the script will use for lookups.

Copy and paste the code below at the beginning of your script.

@(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) $NameList = @(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $ServerList

Lookups in the Domain Name System (DNS)

The programme must then be able to check up each of the provided names’ DNS records. In this scenario, the foreach loop will run over the list of records and use Resolve-DnsName to seek up each name.

The line $FinalResult = @() generates an empty array that will be used to hold the final result. PowerShell then sends each item in the $NameList variable to a variable called $Name using the foreach loop.

The line $tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAd

The Resolve-DnsName command is then used to locate DNS A records and fill the $tempObj data using the try statement. The catch statement will catch the error if the DNS lookup fails, and the error will be stored in the $tempObj object.

The value of the $tempObj object will be added to the $FinalResult at the Conclusion of each iteration. The loop will end after the final item in the $NameList array has been handled. The value of the $FinalResult will then be shown.

Copy and paste the code below at the end of your script. There are no values that need to be changed.

$tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage try $FinalResult = @()foreach ($Name in $NameList) $tempObj = “” $dnsRecord = Resolve-DnsName; $dnsRecord = Resolve-DnsName; $dnsRecord = Resolv -Server $Name Stop | Where-Object

If you manage web or mail servers, you know how important it is to have properly set DNS records. Missing DNS records may result in a variety of issues, such as people being unable to access your website or emails not being sent. It’s a good thing the PowerShell Resolve-DnsName cmdlet exists, since it allows you to automate DNS record monitoring using scripting.

An administrator’s day is already hectic enough, and manually verifying whether DNS entries can be resolved correctly adds to the workload.

In this article, you’ll discover what the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet does and how to use it in PowerShell to query DNS records. You’ll also learn how to develop a rudimentary script to generate a report of your nominated DNS records to monitor at the Conclusion of this article.

Prerequisites

This is a walkthrough, so if you want to follow along with the examples, you’ll need the following:

The DNS Resolver in PowerShell is called Resolve-DnsName.

A DNS query may be done in a variety of ways. The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is analogous to Windows’ nslookup command-line utility, or the dig command if you’re a Linux administrator.

DNS record monitoring and reporting services are available on several websites. These third-party services, however, almost always come at a fee. There is a free option that also enables you to demonstrate your scripting abilities!

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet translates DNS names to IP addresses and vice versa, as its name indicates. This cmdlet is part of the dnsclient PowerShell module, which is included with Windows 10, Windows Server 2012/R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019 as of this writing.

Resolve-DnsName returns objects that may be saved, altered, and exported since it is a PowerShell cmdlet. For example, executing the command Resolve-DnsName google.com to seek for the DNS record for google.com results in the output displayed below.

Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.

The result was delivered as an object, which you can use to export the data to a CSV file or change the format to generate HTML reports.

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is not the same as the previous nslookup command. The result of nslookup is a simple string. In the screenshot below, you can see an example. It will be difficult to extract any of this information.

nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslooknslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslook

Querying DNS Records of Various Types

By default, Resolve-DnsName looks for DNS records with the A and AAAA suffixes. If you use the command below to search for the DNS record for gmail.com, for example:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName

Only the AAAA and A records are returned, as seen below. This is due to the fact that the kind of DNS record to search for was not provided.

Given that gmail.com is a domain used by Google’s email service, an MX record must be connected with it, right? There’s no need to guess when you may use this command to confirm:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName -Type MX

The MX record list for gmail.com is seen in the output in the image below.

Visit this page and check for the table for the -Type argument to learn more about the various record kinds that may be used with Resolve-DnsName. You may also use the command get-help Resolve-DnsName to get the Resolve-DnsName help.

Using Specific DNS Lookup Servers

By default, Resolve-DnsName utilizes the DNS server addresses that are specified on your computer. However, you may direct Resolve-DnsName to utilize a specified DNS server for lookups.

For example, if you wish to lookup records using Google Public DNS, you may do so by using the -Server argument in your command, as seen below.

$dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8’,’8 adamtheautomator.com Resolve-DnsName -Server $dnsServer

The command above would provide a result similar to the one seen in the picture below.

Results of a DNS record query using a certain DNS serverResults of a DNS record query using a certain DNS server

“Why would I need to utilize a separate DNS server?” you may be thinking at this point. That is a legitimate concern. You’ll probably receive the same result whether you use your machine’s default DNS server or another DNS server to seek for the same record.

There might be a variety of reasons to utilize Resolve-DnsName with distinct DNS servers. These are some of the possible reasons:

  • Speed – Some DNS servers are likely to be more responsive than others.
  • Security – Some DNS servers may have stronger security mechanisms in place to protect against hijacking and assaults than others.
  • Records availability — In most cases, businesses have their own internal DNS servers that house zones and records for names that are only resolved inside the company. In this situation, using a public DNS server to search for an internal name would fail.

Failure to search up a DNS recordFailure to search up a DNS record

  • Requests are not being sent by DNS servers – DNS forwarding is not permitted in certain companies. Using them to search for public DNS records will result in a failure.
  • Troubleshooting and Testing — If your preferred DNS servers aren’t working, try testing your lookups with another DNS server.

Using a PowerShell Script to Report DNS Records

Now that you know how to use the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet, you’ll learn how to develop a PowerShell script to monitor and report DNS entries in this section. You should be able to create this script using the information you’ve obtained in the previous parts.

Create a new file called GetDnsRecord.ps1 in your preferred script editor.

The Variables Must Be Defined

Determine which variables will be used first. The following are some of the factors that will be considered:

  • $NameList – The names of the DNS records you want your script to query will be stored in this variable.
  • $Serverlist – This variable is used to provide the DNS servers that the script will use for lookups.

Copy and paste the code below at the beginning of your script.

@(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) $NameList = @(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $ServerList

Lookups in the Domain Name System (DNS)

The programme must then be able to check up each of the provided names’ DNS records. In this scenario, the foreach loop will run over the list of records and use Resolve-DnsName to seek up each name.

The line $FinalResult = @() generates an empty array that will be used to hold the final result. PowerShell then sends each item in the $NameList variable to a variable called $Name using the foreach loop.

The line $tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAd

The Resolve-DnsName command is then used to locate DNS A records and fill the $tempObj data using the try statement. The catch statement will catch the error if the DNS lookup fails, and the error will be stored in the $tempObj object.

The value of the $tempObj object will be added to the $FinalResult at the Conclusion of each iteration. The loop will end after the final item in the $NameList array has been handled. The value of the $FinalResult will then be shown.

Copy and paste the code below at the end of your script. There are no values that need to be changed.

$FinalResult = @()foreach ($Name in $NameList) { $tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage try { $dnsRecord = Resolve-DnsName $Name -Server $ServerList -ErrorAction Stop | Where-Object {$_.Type -eq ‘A’} $tempObj.Name = $Name $tempObj.IPAddress = ($dnsRecord.IPAddress -join ‘,’) $tempObj.Status = ‘OK’ $tempObj.ErrorMessage = ” } catch { $tempObj.Name = $Name $tempObj.IPAddress = ” $tempObj.Status = ‘NOT_OK’ $tempObj.ErrorMessage = $_.Exception.Message } $FinalResult += $tempObj}return $FinalResult

Run the script in PowerShell by executing GetDnsRecord after saving it. ps1. The output is seen in the example below.

Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.

The output is an object, as you can see from the above result, which is important if you want to export the results to a file like CSV using the command below.

.GetDnsRecord.ps1 | DnsRecord.csv -NoTypeInformation | Export-Csv DnsRecord.csv

The CSV output would like the image below.

Exporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV fileExporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV file

Conclusion

You’ve learnt the fundamentals of using the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet to search for DSN data in PowerShell in this post. You’ve also seen how Resolve-DnsName differs from other utilities such as the nslookup command.

You saw how to utilize Resolve-DnsName in a script to automate DNS record lookups. This might be used as a monitoring tool to make sure you’re up to date on the status of the DNS records you manage.

Using your PowerShell scripting abilities, you may improve the reporting script by adding code that sends the report via email to selected recipients automatically. It may also be tweaked to provide a more appealing HTML output.

Finally, whether you use it directly or using scripts, Resolve-DnsName is an outstanding tool for DNS lookup. Now that you know how it works, it’s up to you to figure out how to incorporate it into your administrative chores.

Additional Reading

.Type -eq ‘A’ $ServerList -ErrorAction $Name = $tempObj.Name ($dnsRecord.IPAddress -join ‘,’) $tempObj.IPAddress = ($dnsRecord.IPAddress -join ‘,’) ‘OK’ for $tempObj.Status $tempObj.ErrorMessage = ” $tempObj.ErrorMessage = ” $tempObj.ErrorMessage = $tempObj.Name = $Name catch “, $tempObj.IPAddress = “, $tempObj.IPAddress = “, $ ‘NOT OK’ for $tempObj.Status

If you manage web or mail servers, you know how important it is to have properly set DNS records. Missing DNS records may result in a variety of issues, such as people being unable to access your website or emails not being sent. It’s a good thing the PowerShell Resolve-DnsName cmdlet exists, since it allows you to automate DNS record monitoring using scripting.

An administrator’s day is already hectic enough, and manually verifying whether DNS entries can be resolved correctly adds to the workload.

In this article, you’ll discover what the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet does and how to use it in PowerShell to query DNS records. You’ll also learn how to develop a rudimentary script to generate a report of your nominated DNS records to monitor at the Conclusion of this article.

Prerequisites

This is a walkthrough, so if you want to follow along with the examples, you’ll need the following:

The DNS Resolver in PowerShell is called Resolve-DnsName.

A DNS query may be done in a variety of ways. The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is analogous to Windows’ nslookup command-line utility, or the dig command if you’re a Linux administrator.

DNS record monitoring and reporting services are available on several websites. These third-party services, however, almost always come at a fee. There is a free option that also enables you to demonstrate your scripting abilities!

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet translates DNS names to IP addresses and vice versa, as its name indicates. This cmdlet is part of the dnsclient PowerShell module, which is included with Windows 10, Windows Server 2012/R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019 as of this writing.

Resolve-DnsName returns objects that may be saved, altered, and exported since it is a PowerShell cmdlet. For example, executing the command Resolve-DnsName google.com to seek for the DNS record for google.com results in the output displayed below.

Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.Using Resolve-DnsName, you may search up DNS records.

The result was delivered as an object, which you can use to export the data to a CSV file or change the format to generate HTML reports.

The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet is not the same as the previous nslookup command. The result of nslookup is a simple string. In the screenshot below, you can see an example. It will be difficult to extract any of this information.

nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslooknslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslookup nslook

Querying DNS Records of Various Types

By default, Resolve-DnsName looks for DNS records with the A and AAAA suffixes. If you use the command below to search for the DNS record for gmail.com, for example:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName

Only the AAAA and A records are returned, as seen below. This is due to the fact that the kind of DNS record to search for was not provided.

Given that gmail.com is a domain used by Google’s email service, an MX record must be connected with it, right? There’s no need to guess when you may use this command to confirm:

gmail.com -Name Resolve-DnsName -Type MX

The MX record list for gmail.com is seen in the output in the image below.

Visit this page and check for the table for the -Type argument to learn more about the various record kinds that may be used with Resolve-DnsName. You may also use the command get-help Resolve-DnsName to get the Resolve-DnsName help.

Using Specific DNS Lookup Servers

By default, Resolve-DnsName utilizes the DNS server addresses that are specified on your computer. However, you may direct Resolve-DnsName to utilize a specified DNS server for lookups.

For example, if you wish to lookup records using Google Public DNS, you may do so by using the -Server argument in your command, as seen below.

$dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $dnsServer = @(‘8.8.8.8’,’8 adamtheautomator.com Resolve-DnsName -Server $dnsServer

The command above would provide a result similar to the one seen in the picture below.

Results of a DNS record query using a certain DNS serverResults of a DNS record query using a certain DNS server

“Why would I need to utilize a separate DNS server?” you may be thinking at this point. That is a legitimate concern. You’ll probably receive the same result whether you use your machine’s default DNS server or another DNS server to seek for the same record.

There might be a variety of reasons to utilize Resolve-DnsName with distinct DNS servers. These are some of the possible reasons:

  • Speed – Some DNS servers are likely to be more responsive than others.
  • Security – Some DNS servers may have stronger security mechanisms in place to protect against hijacking and assaults than others.
  • Records availability — In most cases, businesses have their own internal DNS servers that house zones and records for names that are only resolved inside the company. In this situation, using a public DNS server to search for an internal name would fail.

Failure to search up a DNS recordFailure to search up a DNS record

  • Requests are not being sent by DNS servers – DNS forwarding is not permitted in certain companies. Using them to search for public DNS records will result in a failure.
  • Troubleshooting and Testing — If your preferred DNS servers aren’t working, try testing your lookups with another DNS server.

Using a PowerShell Script to Report DNS Records

Now that you know how to use the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet, you’ll learn how to develop a PowerShell script to monitor and report DNS entries in this section. You should be able to create this script using the information you’ve obtained in the previous parts.

Create a new file called GetDnsRecord.ps1 in your preferred script editor.

The Variables Must Be Defined

Determine which variables will be used first. The following are some of the factors that will be considered:

  • $NameList – The names of the DNS records you want your script to query will be stored in this variable.
  • $Serverlist – This variable is used to provide the DNS servers that the script will use for lookups.

Copy and paste the code below at the beginning of your script.

@(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) $NameList = @(‘adamtheautomator.com’,’powershell.org’,’xyz.local’) @(‘8.8.8.8′,’8.8.4.4’) $ServerList

Lookups in the Domain Name System (DNS)

The programme must then be able to check up each of the provided names’ DNS records. In this scenario, the foreach loop will run over the list of records and use Resolve-DnsName to seek up each name.

The line $FinalResult = @() generates an empty array that will be used to hold the final result. PowerShell then sends each item in the $NameList variable to a variable called $Name using the foreach loop.

The line $tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage | Select-Object Name,IPAd

The Resolve-DnsName command is then used to locate DNS A records and fill the $tempObj data using the try statement. The catch statement will catch the error if the DNS lookup fails, and the error will be stored in the $tempObj object.

The value of the $tempObj object will be added to the $FinalResult at the Conclusion of each iteration. The loop will end after the final item in the $NameList array has been handled. The value of the $FinalResult will then be shown.

Copy and paste the code below at the end of your script. There are no values that need to be changed.

$FinalResult = @()foreach ($Name in $NameList) { $tempObj = “” | Select-Object Name,IPAddress,Status,ErrorMessage try { $dnsRecord = Resolve-DnsName $Name -Server $ServerList -ErrorAction Stop | Where-Object {$_.Type -eq ‘A’} $tempObj.Name = $Name $tempObj.IPAddress = ($dnsRecord.IPAddress -join ‘,’) $tempObj.Status = ‘OK’ $tempObj.ErrorMessage = ” } catch { $tempObj.Name = $Name $tempObj.IPAddress = ” $tempObj.Status = ‘NOT_OK’ $tempObj.ErrorMessage = $_.Exception.Message } $FinalResult += $tempObj}return $FinalResult

Run the script in PowerShell by executing GetDnsRecord after saving it. ps1. The output is seen in the example below.

Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.

The output is an object, as you can see from the above result, which is important if you want to export the results to a file like CSV using the command below.

.GetDnsRecord.ps1 | DnsRecord.csv -NoTypeInformation | Export-Csv DnsRecord.csv

The CSV output would like the image below.

Exporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV fileExporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV file

Conclusion

You’ve learnt the fundamentals of using the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet to search for DSN data in PowerShell in this post. You’ve also seen how Resolve-DnsName differs from other utilities such as the nslookup command.

You saw how to utilize Resolve-DnsName in a script to automate DNS record lookups. This might be used as a monitoring tool to make sure you’re up to date on the status of the DNS records you manage.

Using your PowerShell scripting abilities, you may improve the reporting script by adding code that sends the report via email to selected recipients automatically. It may also be tweaked to provide a more appealing HTML output.

Finally, whether you use it directly or using scripts, Resolve-DnsName is an outstanding tool for DNS lookup. Now that you know how it works, it’s up to you to figure out how to incorporate it into your administrative chores.

Additional Reading

.Exception.Message = $tempObj.ErrorMessage $FinalResult += $tempObjreturn $FinalResult$FinalResult$FinalResult$FinalResult$FinalResult$FinalResult$FinalResult$F

Run the script in PowerShell by executing GetDnsRecord after saving it. ps1. The output is seen in the example below.

Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.Resolve-DnsName is a script for looking up numerous DNS records.

The output is an object, as you can see from the above result, which is important if you want to export the results to a file like CSV using the command below.

.GetDnsRecord.ps1 | DnsRecord.csv -NoTypeInformation | Export-Csv DnsRecord.csv

The CSV output would like the image below.

Exporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV fileExporting a DNS record lookup report to a CSV file

Conclusion

You’ve learnt the fundamentals of using the Resolve-DnsName cmdlet to search for DSN data in PowerShell in this post. You’ve also seen how Resolve-DnsName differs from other utilities such as the nslookup command.

You saw how to utilize Resolve-DnsName in a script to automate DNS record lookups. This might be used as a monitoring tool to make sure you’re up to date on the status of the DNS records you manage.

Using your PowerShell scripting abilities, you may improve the reporting script by adding code that sends the report via email to selected recipients automatically. It may also be tweaked to provide a more appealing HTML output.

Finally, whether you use it directly or using scripts, Resolve-DnsName is an outstanding tool for DNS lookup. Now that you know how it works, it’s up to you to figure out how to incorporate it into your administrative chores.

Additional Reading

The “resolve cleaner” is a tool that can be used to clean out old files and registry entries. The purpose of this tool is to make sure your computer is as clean as possible before installing a new program or driver.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does it mean to have resolve?

A: Resolve is the act of coming to a decision or making plans for the future. It can also mean getting past an obstacle that was blocking your goal, such as finishing a project at work.

What is the same meaning of resolve?

A: The word resolve means to settle a disagreement, reach an agreement on something.

What is an example of resolve?

A: Resolve is a key moment in the plot of The Hobbit.

Related Tags

  • resolve company
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